Posts tagged ‘moms’

January 3rd, 2012

Get Published by The Know It All Mom

Recently, I have received many inquiries about guest posting on my site. The Universe is trying to tell me something. The message: Get back to the beginning. When I started this blog, my intention was to create a forum for parents everywhere to share their experiences, ideas, challenges, successes, frustrations, questions and concerns. But I am not good at delegating. I have tried to carry the blog myself, which has lead to months of fervent activity, followed by periods of complete inactivity. As I freely admit on my About Me page, I don’t actually know it all, but I’ve always believed that together we can figure it out, sharing a few laughs, and maybe even a few tears, along the way. So let’s share.

Beginning, in January, 2012—that means NOW folks, for all of you writers and wannabes out there!—I will be accepting submissions for publication. If you would like your creative non-fiction writing to be considered for publication on The Know It All Mom, here is what you need to do:

  1. Email your story ideas or completed pieces that have NOT been published elsewhere to tkiam@theknowitallmom.com.
  2. Type the word SUBMISSION and your word count in the subject line of your email, please, otherwise your work might just get lost in the plethora of email that finds it’s way to me, and that would be sad. :( Submissions must be creative non-fiction. Although I love to read poetry, short stories, and most genres of fiction, the Know It All Mom is not the place for these children to find a home.
  3. Keep submissions under 500 words. Longer pieces may be considered, but only if the content cannot possibly be covered effectively without saying more.
  4. Expect to be edited. This is in no way an indication that you are not a talented, gifted individual with the literary genius of Jane Austen, but rather a simple fact that it’s my blog, I like what I like, and I reserve the right to post things only after I am 100% satisfied.
  5. Do not send attachments. Please copy and paste your submission into the body of your email. Attachments can be cumbersome. They don’t open, they lose formatting, and are generally a pain in the butt. Pasting text directly into your email simplifies everything. Attachments will not be opened. Thank you in advance.
  6. Make sure your work is thematically consistent with the Know It All Mom. To understand who I am and the mandate behind my blog, the About Me page is an excellent place to start. Note that I prefer anecdotal, personal stories of life as a mother/woman/wife/daughter/sister/friend/parent. Itemized How-To or Top-Ten-type lists are NOT my favourite. I’d rather read how you developed the list than the list itself. I like honesty. I like writing that comes from the heart with a straight-forward, no-nonsense approach. I do not like self-indulgence. This is a fine line to walk, I know, I tip-toe along it every time I sit down to compose something. Still, it must be done. I like people with opinions, even opinions I do not share. Disagreement is essential to dialogue, so take a stand and tell me what you think. If you can make me laugh, great! If you can make me cry, that’s good, too. To familiarize yourself with the type of stories I am interested in receiving, read some of my posts, e.g., Confession Time, Coming from a Place of Yes, or One Joint is One Too Many, or better yet, read some of my published pieces found here: Writing. If you are still in doubt, email anyway. The worst that can happen is that I say, “No.”
  7. Do not expect an immediate response. I will respond to you, I promise, but as we all know, “Life is what happens while we’re making other plans.” (John Lennon said that, I think…anyone know?) In other words, I plan to get back to everyone as quickly as I can, regardless of the outcome of your submission, but only after the realities of my day-to-day life as a wife, mother, chauffeur, chef, laundress, etc., have been managed.

Thanks for reading, and I hope to hear from you very soon. Happy writing!

August 17th, 2010

Confession Time

“Moooommm…”

The call slithers towards me down the long corridor between where I sit and my daughter’s bedroom. It starts quietly, softly, a nighttime whisper hissed from the shadows of the retreating day.

Before I can respond, it comes again.  “Mooommmmmmm…” A little louder this time.

I have just, not more than ten minutes ago, tucked my 12 year-old Little Miss in for the night and retreated to the sanctity of our living room. Enveloped by the golden hues of the streetlamp just outside our window, I’m ready to relax, a good book held in one hand, a soothing cup of Zen herbal tea in the other, and the companionable silence of my husband working on his lap top beside me while our two cats sleep the deep, deep sleep of lazy felines. Ah, the end of a long day.

But I know this call. I’ve heard it before. In the quiet, lonely darkness of her room her mind races. The challenges of twelve-year-old-life loom large when illuminated by moonlight and Little Miss needs to talk. It is confession time.

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June 10th, 2010

Starbucks Should Be Licensed

Please enjoy this short little piece, posted today, June 10, 2010, on the Sweet Mama Guest Blogger web site.

“I’m gonna need a more complicated drink,” exclaims my 12-year-old daughter, her Grande, non-fat, Chai-tea latte with just a hint of cinnamon clasped carefully in both hands. I look sheepishly at my own Grande dark roast, black, clearly far too simplistic to meet her standards, and wonder what the heck she means.

Sensing my consternation, she sighs heavily in the manner instinctive to pre-teens who are just now realizing, to their dismay, that their parents don’t know everything, and she attempts to clear the fog.

“You know, for when I’m an adult.”

No, I don’t know, but my interest is certainly piqued.

A combination double-sigh-with-an-eye-roll follows, a move she has just recently mastered and which deserves a perfect ten, both technically and artistically. Exasperated, she continues: “For when I’m one of those ladies dressed in a nice, black trench-coat, with big, Jackie-O sunglasses, good hair and great shoes, always sipping from a Starbucks cup. I’m gonna need a fancier drink.”

In an instant, her vision of her future is clear. She sees herself out in the world, a successful, confident, stylish woman, with my penchant for shoes and a potentially hazardous addiction to caffeine. She already has the glasses. But I am not ready. I have not allowed myself to look that far ahead.

And so, with the April sunshine casting a golden halo around the face of the daughter I have spent the last twelve years adoring, I am forced to see her changing before my eyes. Until now, I have chosen to see what has come before. The hours of story telling and handholding, school concerts and field trips, birthday parties and bedtime cuddles. But with a moustache of cappuccino-coloured foam settled on her upper lip, I cosmic zoom fifteen years into the future and come face-to-face with her adult avatar. She is growing up. Her childhood is slipping away. It’s going take something a lot stronger than Starbucks to get me through this.

May 13th, 2010

Reflections in My Bathroom Mirror

From iStock Photo

This morning, as we prepared for our morning walk to school, I stood side-by-side with my daughter at our bathroom vanity. She fiddled with her hair, brushed her teeth and applied (with some need for re-work) her mascara. There she was, unaware of the scrutiny from my side-ways gaze and completely un-self-conscious. I was struck. The mirror reflection that I saw—not the one directly in front of me, but the one two feet to my right—was of a ghost from days gone by. There I stood, a young girl replete with newness, fresh and un-jaded, innocent of what lay in wait: challenges to be conquered, dreams to come true and expectations left unfulfilled.

In an instant decades long, I saw it all: Her future, my past, our present life together. The face of the young woman she will be, vaguely veiled behind the features of the child slipping away. I suddenly longed for the days of bed-time stories, bath-time frolics and hand-holding as we crossed the street. Approaching her thirteenth birthday, she reads herself to sleep, would rather die than have me anywhere near her bath and has crossed the street on her own for quite some time, thank you very much.

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March 30th, 2010

After the Third Trimester

I believe that we parent our children in trimesters. Similar to the trimesters of pregnancy, each phase of parenting is characterized by unique developmental stages for both mother and child.

Parenting Trimester 1: From birth to full-time school-age, ages 0-6.

During this phase, as our children grow from infants to toddlers, and from toddlers to school-aged children, we, too, grow. At first we simply try to find our legs, dedicating ourselves to something small and precious in a way that we never have before, and adjusting our identities from woman or wife or partner, or however we previously defined ourselves, to mother. Many of us set aside years of education and hard-won careers to learn to function on three hours or less of sleep each night while seldom, if ever, going the washroom uninterrupted. We are blown away by the sheer power and force of mother-love. We believe that this is both the most challenging and rewarding time in a parent’s life, but we are wrong.

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March 23rd, 2010

Little Miss Posted Her Thoughts

My Little Miss Know It All has, for the first time, posted her thoughts.

To read her response to my March 23 post, Getting Started, click http://theknowitallmom.com/thoughts-from-little-miss-know-it-all/.

March 23rd, 2010

Getting Started

When I decided to build a blog I thought, rather naively, Hey, I can do that. If that Julie-lady featured in that Meryl Streep flick can blog with such success, why can’t I?

I will tell you why. Because I am functionally technologically illiterate. Over the past several years, working from home as I have to “be here” for my daughter, a basic understanding of Word, Power Point, Excel and the Internet, combined with the ability to string sentences together into cohesive thoughts and some communications savvy, got me through the work day. But take note: A technological revolution has transpired while I was writing newsletters and volunteering to make cupcakes for the school staff appreciation lunch.

I spent yesterday trying to set up my RSS feed. What the @$*%! Today it was Twitter. Tomorrow, plug-ins and widgets (as soon as I find out what these are). It never ends. I am drowning in a sea of terminology and jargon and links and programming protocol that leaves me breathless, frustrated, and, on more than one occasion, sobbing over my keyboard into a computer monitor strewn with words I’ve never seen.

But stay tuned. I am nothing if not stubborn and I shall overcome! The fact that you are actually reading this is a triumph in itself. Next post: More about my life as mom, less about the challenges of playing technology catch-up.

October 27th, 2009

Under construction, but coming soon!

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